Lieutenant Colonel Richard Annesley West

Discussion in 'Military Biographies' started by liverpool annie, Jan 22, 2009.

  1. liverpool annie

    liverpool annie New Member

    Lieutenant Colonel Richard Annesley West VC, DSO & Bar, MC.
    He was the son of Augustus E and Sarah West of Whitepark, County Fermanagh and husband of Maude E West of 14 Trafalgar Square Chelsea London.

    He had served during the Boer War as a trooper with the Imperial Yeomanry and remained in South Africa until the outbreak of World War 1 .... he arrived in France in August 1914 as a Lieutenant in A or C Squadron, North Irish Horse, later serving in the Tank Corps.

    He was killed in action while attached to the Tank Corps, aged 40, on 2 September 1918, and is buried at Mory Abbey Military Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais, France, grave III.G.4.

    http://www.notoriousstrumpets.com.au/NIH/Images/People/Full pictures/West.htm

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=9955954

    Lieutenant Colonel R. A. West, V.C., D.S.O.

    Victoria Cross London Gazette 30.10.1918

    Acting Lieutenant Colonel Richard Annesley West - the North Irish Horse (S.R.) seconded to the 6th Battalion Tank Corps

    Date of Act of Bravery, 21.8.1918. Attack at Courcelles, Western Front.

    During an attack, the infantry having lost their bearings in the dense fog, this officer at once collected and re-organised any men he could find and led them to their objective in face of heavy machine-gun fire. Throughout the whole action he displayed the most utter disregard of danger, and the capture of the objective was in a great part due to his initiative and gallantry. On a subsequent occasion it was intended that a battalion of light Tanks under the command of this officer should exploit the initial infantry and heavy Tank attack. He therefore went forward in order to keep in touch with the progress of the battle, and arrived at the front line when the enemy were in process of delivering a local counter attack. The infantry battalion had suffered heavy officer casualties, and its flanks were exposed. Realising that there was a danger giving way, he at once rode out in front of them under extremely heavy machine-gun and rifle fire and rallied the men. In spite of the fact that the enemy were close upon him he took charge of the situation and detailed non-commissioned officers to replace officer casualties. He then rode up and down in front of them in face of certain death, encouraging the men and calling to them, “Stick it, men; show them fight; and for God’s sake put up a good fight.” He fell riddled by machine-gun bullets.
    The magnificent bravery of this very gallant officer at the critical moment inspired the infantry to be redoubled efforts, and the hostile attack was defeated.
     

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  2. liverpool annie

    liverpool annie New Member

    Here's some more .... ( some the same information though !! )

    Lieutenant Colonel RICHARD ANNESLEY WEST VC, DSO and Bar, MC
    Attached Tank Corps
    Saw action in the Boer War.
    Killed in Action age 40, Monday, 2nd September, 1918, at Vauix Vraucort, France.
    Son of Augustus E. and Sarah West, Whitepark, County Fermanagh.
    Husband of Maude E. West, Chelsea, London.
    Buried: Mory Abbey Military Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais, France.
    Grave Location: III.G.4

    His name is inscribed on the Holy Apostles Church Memorial.

    Extract from the Second Supplement to the London Gazette, Issue 30982.
    War Office, 30th October, 1918.
    "His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Victoria Cross to Capt. (A/Lt-Col) Richard Annesley West, DSO., M.C., late North Irish Horse (Cav.S.R.) and Tank Corps.
    For most conspicuous bravery, leadership and self-sacrifice.

    During an attack, the infantry having lost their bearings in the dense fog, this officer at once collected and re-organised any men he could find and led them to their objective in face of heavy machine-gun fire. Throughout the whole action he displayed the most utter disregard of danger and the capture of the objective was in a great part due to his initiative and gallantry.

    On a subsequent occasion it was intended that a battalion of light Tanks under the command of this officer should exploit the initial infantry and heavy Tank attack. He therefore went forward in order to keep in touch with the progress of the battle and arrived at the front line when the enemy were in process of delivering a local counter-attack. The infantry battalion had suffered heavy officer casualties and its flanks were exposed. Realising that there was a danger of the battalion giving way, he at once rode out in front of them under extremely heavy machine-gun and rifle fire and rallied the men. In spite of the fact that the enemy were close upon him he took charge of the situation and detailed non-commissioned officers to replace officer casualties. He then rode up and down in front of them in the face of certain death, encouraging the men and calling to them, "Stick it, men: show them fight; and for God's sake put up a good fight." He fell riddled by machine-gun bullets.

    The magnificent bravery of this very gallant officer at the critical moment inspired the infantry to redouble efforts and the hostile attack was defeated."

    For a time, the Lt. Colonel's Victoria Cross was on public display at the Tank Museum, Bovington, Dorset, England.

    Extract from Supplement to the London Gazette, Issue 30997. Award of a Bar to the Distinguished Service Order:
    "Capt. (A/Maj.) Richard Annesley West, D.S.O., N. Irish Horse, S.R., attd.Tank Corps.
    For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership. He commanded a compnay of light Tanks with great skill. He had two horses shot under him during the day and he and his orderly killed five of the enemy and took seven prisoners. He rendered great services to the cavalry by his personal reconnaissance and, late in the day, under heavy machine-gun fire, he rallied the crews of his disabled Tanks and withdrew them with great skill. He set a splended example of courage and devotion to duty throughout the operation."
    The award of the D.S.O. is recorded in a Supplement to the London Gazette Issue 30450.

    Awarded 1914 Star - Qualified Wednesday, 21st August 1914. Posthumously awarded Clasp to 1914 Star, 6.4.21.

    The Tank Corps in 1916

    http://www.geocities.com/vqpvqp/nih/inmemorium/ww1/1111.html

    http://www.geocities.com/vqpvqp/nih/Photos/West.html
     
  3. liverpool annie

    liverpool annie New Member

    This was earlier .....

    On 21 August 1918 at Courcelles, France, during an attack, the infantry lost their bearings in dense fog and Lieutenant Colonel West at once collected any men he could find and led them to their objective, in face of heavy machine-gun fire. On 2 September at Vaulx-Vraucourt, he arrived at the front line when the enemy were delivering a local counter-attack. The infantry battalion had suffered heavy officer casualties and realizing the danger if they gave way, and despite the enemy being almost upon them, Colonel West rode up and down in face of certain death, encouraging the men. He fell riddled with bullets. His magnificent bravery at a critical moment so inspired the infantry that the hostile attack was defeated. One of the infantrymen he inspired may have been Roland Shaw.

    http://www.taniaparkes.com.au/test/NIH/Images/People/Full pictures/West.htm
     

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