CWGC Graves That Are Different

Discussion in 'World War 1' started by liverpool annie, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. liverpool annie

    liverpool annie New Member

    Here's something a bit out of the ordinary ....... ( I believe it's in Denton ) .... but I wonder how many more of them are in different cemeteries ?

    Rifle Brigade South Lancashire and Manchester Regiments !
     

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  2. Hill 40

    Hill 40 New Member

    There are a few to be found (though they're pretty rare) mainly in the UK, but I think there is at least one in Norway also. I believe they were of an experimental pattern.

    here's one (and also a "double) at Bodelwyddan, N.Wales...
     

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  3. Hill 40

    Hill 40 New Member

    ...and whilst at Bodelwyddan, i thought i'd post an image of these (mainly because I like them in black!!!) - 3 different materials used for three neighbouring special memorials...
     

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  4. liverpool annie

    liverpool annie New Member

    I thought only the German headstones were in black ! .... one of the conditions of the Armistice !:(

    Wonder why they would have British ones ?

    Annie :)
     
  5. Hill 40

    Hill 40 New Member

    Don't get me started on that one, Annie!!!!:D It's a complete and utter myth! (they were black because of the tar-type substance used to preserve and weather proof the wooden crosses and no other reason). Grey seems the commonest colour for a German headstone, but they can be found in a variety of other colours too - from sand coloured and various browns (and blacks!) to almost yellow and pink! (the one on my avatar isn't black either - it's concrete!)

    below is a nice image of a "very light black" headstoned cemetery!!!!:D
     

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  6. Hill 40

    Hill 40 New Member

    Local(ish) slate. CWGC headstones can be found in a variety of materials... such as these red ones at Auchonvillers and a view of two different materials used at Bleue Maison near Eperlecques...
     

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  7. liverpool annie

    liverpool annie New Member

    I wrote this when I was talking about the Peace Treaty ! ........ I've always felt that it was an awful thing to be included in it !! :(

    http://www.trabel.com/ieper/ieper-vladslo.htm
     
  8. Hill 40

    Hill 40 New Member


    Where does the Versailles Treaty stipulate that the Germans cannot use white stone? This is something that I've heard many times, but am yet to see anything to back up that claim.

    I have to say that the article that you link to is an unfortunate example of the general misconception of German war cemeteries that is so prevelent these days - oft quoted by tour guides and teachers - the worrying thing is these misconceptions are what the facts of the future are built upon. The WWW is a double edged sword in this respect...

    for black stone squares - read grey granite

    20 names on each - read 20 names on many, but far from all. The reason? There are 25,644 graves in Vladslo in an area no bigger than 2 football pitches. Until 1956(ish), these were marked by crosses. It certainly looks a lot nicer now!!!

    No flowers? ..They can be seen on occasion, along with wreaths on tripods, candles, framed photographs, etc. It'd look too much like a rubbish tip if tributes were left there too long. Same can be said for French and US cemeteries also.

    No further details other than name, rank and date of death? - further info can be found in the namenbuch in the entrance and, besides, apart from regimental detail, the same can be said for the graves of other nations also.

    no mention of the beautiful surround of this cemetery, nor of any of the (in some cases beautifully carved) original headstones that can be found around the perimeter. No mention of the powerful symbolism of the mighty oaks, nor of the ironwork and architecture that says (no - it shouts!) anything but "defeat", "sorrow" and "penance".

    It's a beautiful place - visitable for far more than just the Kollwitz work:)
     

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  9. Hill 40

    Hill 40 New Member

  10. liverpool annie

    liverpool annie New Member

    Funnily enough I saw that site when I was looking for information before I started this thread !!!!!! :rolleyes:

    I have to go through the Treaty now ....... ( another late night !! :p ) because now you've made me think !!

    By the way ... all cemeteries are beautiful to me !!!!!! :)
     

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